Kids, News

25th Anniversary in the Archives: Hearing Things Differently

Some stories demand to be heard. These are not the books to read quietly to oneself on a crowded train or in a library—these are the books that need speaking, rhyming, shouting, different voices and animal noises. But most of all, these are the books that need sharing. They need to be performed for an audience who can respond and interact in kind, and then call for encores. These are books that gain special and amazing powers when they are read aloud.

For this penultimate look into 25 years of Chronicle Children’s books, we feature six Chronicle titles that embody this important element. However, I could not showcase reading books aloud without, well, some reading aloud! So, with the help of my wonderful coworkers, and film director extraordinaire Angela Chen, this post features a video compilation of readings from Chronicle employees—each performed a little differently, but all with the same great energy and joy. Pop in some headphones and enjoy!

Titles featured (in order):
Diggers Go by Steve Light
Duck! Rabbit! by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Tom Lichtenheld
Little Pea by Amy Krouse Rosenthal, illustrated by Jen Corace
Frank Was a Monster Who Wanted to Dance by Keith Graves
Down to the Sea with Mr. Magee by Chris Van Dusen
The Templeton Twins Have an Idea by Ellis Weiner, illustrated by Jeremy Holmes

A big, big, BIG thank you to our read-aloud volunteers for bringing your enthusiasm, voices and occasionally props to your performances: Mia Blankensop, Adam Schwartz, Peter Perez, Nion McEvoy, Lara Starr, Guinevere de la Mare, Liz Marotte, Will Schrom, Melissa Manlove, Amanda Poulsen Dix, Liza Algar, Liz Rico, Amber Morley, Alexis Watts, Jack Jensen, Kristine Brogno, Kelli Chipponeri, Christina Amini, Molly Krauss, Alexandra Williams, Shona Burns, Tom Fernald, Christine Carswell, and Ginee Seo.

“We have an obligation to read aloud to our children. To read them things they enjoy. To read to them stories we are already tired of. To do the voices, to make it interesting, and not to stop reading to them just because they learn to read to themselves.”
- Neil Gaiman, “Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming”

Julia Patrick
Sales Materials Coordinator

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