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Chicken Big

By Keith Graves

7-1/2 x 11 in; 40 pp;
full-color throughout, ages 4-8
Guided Reading Level: M
Hardcover
August 2010
ISBN 9780811872379
ISBN10 0811872378

SKU# 9780811872379

$16.99
Usually ships within 2-3 days

Quick Overview

On a teeny little farm, in an itty-bitty coop, a very small hen laid a big, giant egg. And out of this egg came one big, humongous . . . something. "It's big!" clucked the little rooster. "It's enormous!" clucked the small chicken. "It's anelephant!" pe...
Chicken Big


Description

Chicken Big

On a teeny little farm, in an itty-bitty coop, a very small hen laid a big, giant egg. And out of this egg came one big, humongous . . . something. "It's big!" clucked the little rooster. "It's enormous!" clucked the small chicken. "It's anelephant!" peeped the smallest chicken. "Run for your lives!" they cried. No matter how they try, these clueless chickens can't make sense of the gigantic new member of their familyuntil he saves the day. With wacky, laugh-out-loud humor and silliness to spare, this BIG twist on the classic Chicken Little story lends a whole new perspective to what it means to be chicken.

 

More Details

7-1/2 x 11 in; 40 pp;
full-color throughout, ages 4-8
Guided Reading Level: M
Hardcover
August 2010
ISBN 9780811872379
ISBN10 0811872378
Keith Graves is Professor Emeritus at the Chicken School in Austin, Texas, where he teaches courses in chicken history. Strangely, he has the same name as another guy who wrote the book Frank Was a Monster Who Wanted to Dance, as well as some other ridiculous books, but we doubt he's the same guy.

Read an excerpt below Click "Fullscreen"

Customer ReviewsWrite a review here

Customer Reviews Write a review

Fabulously Fun Retake

Fabulously Fun Retake

10/11/11| Rebecca Collegio
"More pees!" More pees!" my two year asks. The first day we had this book I think daddy read it like five times before our kiddo allowed him to put it down. I thought my little guy would be a bit young for this book but I was terribly wrong. He loves it. He loves it so much he's requested it to be read almost every day for over a month.

Chicken Big is a fabulously fun retake on the Chicken Little tale. The illustrations are reminicent of a comic strip with word bubbles popping up here and there animating these crazy little chickens. It starts off, "On a teeny little farm, in an itty-bitty coop, a very small hen laid a big, humongous egg...out popped a big, humongous chick." However, the little chickens couldn't figure out what on earth this humongous thing could be and wouldn't allow him in their coop. Throughout their sad attempts in figuring out what he was (an elephant, squirrel, umbrella, etc.) and fear and frantic reaction to things like acorns dropping, rain and wind, he managed to shelter, protect and enlighten them. At the end of the tale, the big humongous chick saves the day and the nutty little chickens realize that, "Only one thing could be so smart, so kind, so warm, and so brave..."

There are numerous lessons you can pull from this delightful book; not judging someone by how they look, empathy, character, life cycle of a chicken, weather, seasons and science, etc. This would be a great present for kids 2-8 yrs old (probably closer to 4-8 but my 2 year old LOVES this story). It's a fantastic fun read-a-loud and one of my kiddo's new favorites.

fresh story about the barnyard

fresh story about the barnyard

10/11/11| Kirsten Cutler
Graves, Keith. Chicken BIG. Chronicle Books. 2010.

The rooster and chickens do not know what to make of “a big humongous chick” born one day on their farm. “What is it?” asked the rooster. One chicken declares, “It’s big!” A “smaller chicken” declares, “It’s enormous!” while a third chick that is the smallest of the three declares, “It’s an Elephant!” Now the “big humongous chick” takes umbrage at these characterizations, and says, “I don’t feel like an elephant”. Adapting elements of Chicken Little, this wacky story contrasts the deadpan comments of the chick with the silly remarks of the three chickens and the rooster. After an object falls from a tree and hits “the smallest chicken on the head” and the chick identifies the object as an acorn, the rooster comments, “I don’t think elephants eat acorns”, and the three chickens think and decide that maybe the “big humongous chick” is actually a squirrel, and of course, the “big humongous chick” questions that identification. A raindrop hits the “smallest chicken” on her head, and she cries, “The sky is leaking! We’ll all drown! Run for your lives!” The “big humongous chick reassures the chickens and rooster that what’s falling is just rain, and tells them they can all shelter under his wings: so now the silly chickens and rooster decide that the “big chick” cannot be a squirrel but must instead be an umbrella: this delightfully humorous pattern continues. The illustrations are comical and filled with amusing details and expressions that convey wholeheartedly the antic theme of this fresh story about the barnyard: a wonderful book for a raucous story time.

A Very Funny Fable

A Very Funny Fable

10/11/11| Diana Rogers
Chicken Big is a great read-aloud book for all ages. I love Chicken Big! I am impressed with the author's writing and story telling. I think he is pure genius. Keith Graves mentioned that his grandpa read stories to him each night in his bio. First I began reading this delightful children's book in one sitting and howled aloud. As a grandma, it was pure delight to read this winning book to my grandson who giggled with glee and then my husband overheard the story and chuckled as well.

The story starts with the main character, a really big chicken called Chicken Big who was born from a hen egg. The story line moves along with other not-so-smart chicken character's being introduced from the chicken community who are trying to figure out just what this enormous someone really is. Perhaps he's an elephant. At any rate, Chicken Big is just too big to fit into their group so they boot him out.

Soon all the little chickens are clucking with excitement (you know how they get) and seem to be alarmed that all of their chicken eggs have been stolen by a sly red fox. No worries, this story has a very happy ending because Chicken Big saves the day and happily is accepted in the chicken community. There is definitely room for this big dude in their coop!

Charming book with great pictures and humor, plus a classic fable. It's great to laugh, too. ***** stars. I highly recommend Chicken Big to kindergarten-5th grade teachers, parents of little ones and then to all precious grandparents who love those endless laughing moments of complete hysteria, entertainment with education, for sure with their grandchildren. (Makes a great gift book, too).

Chicken BIG

Chicken BIG

10/11/11| Jean Hall
Chicken BIG by Keith Graves is a hilarious hyperbolic take on the old favorite Chicken Little.

Graves has turned the classic Chicken Little on its head by introducing a big, humongous chick into a family of, shall we say, less than brilliant chickens. As I turn the pages these funny looking, funny talking chickens keep trying to figure out what kind of critter this enormous, fluffy yellow thing really is. (BOK!) They are not being very successful. As, the big chick patiently waits for the truth to dawn on the family members he becomes their guardian. His reactions to his odd family shine through the great facial expressions Graves created.

To quote the flap, "Little by little, his kindness and brave rescue...prove to the silly chickens that he is really one of them."

For the kid who feels out-of-place or less than socially accepted (And which kid hasn't at some time?) Chicken BIG will be a light-hearted way to put the problem into perspective, I think.

I can see my grand children (the five year old, the eight year old, AND the thirteen year old) laughing themselves silly as they enjoy the outrageous illustrations and goofy antics in this book. It's adolescent humor with a message, folks. "Everybody needs to belong."

Great Read-Aloud!

Great Read-Aloud!

10/11/11| Pam Tee
Keith Graves is kind of a brilliant guy. I mean he wrote a story that's not only a great read-aloud but which had my two children and myself racing to the end to see what happened.

The story begins with an 'EGG BIG' being laid. Out of it pops a really huge chick. He's so large in fact that the other chickens don't recognize what he is. They stand around using various modifiers that mean BIG until the Smallest Chicken, who isn't "the sharpest beak in the flock", exclaims that Big Chick must be an elephant.

The chickens then more-or-less come to the conclusion that an elephant doesn't belong in a coop, and they shove the oversized chick outside. Things might have gone badly from there except that the next day there's an incident with an acorn. The Smallest Chicken gets bonked on the head, panics, and sends the others running -- for don't ya know, the sky is falling. They are in a serious tizzy until Big Chick calmly points out that there's nothing wrong and that it's only an acorn falling from the tree, the way acorns do. Big Chick then announces that acorns are tasty, which is quite unfortunate because the silly chickens then conclude that Big Chick must be a squirrel, because in their tiny minds they associate squirrels with acorns.

The rest of the book proceeds with similar funny misidentifications as the chickens keep identifying a single act with a particular critter or item. Dryness with Umbrellas, and Warmth with Sweaters, for example.

THE SKINNY:::
The artwork in "Chicken Big" is great fun. The expressions on the birds are priceless.

I really like that this isn't some vacuous story. There are actually some real good ideas to consider here.

After we read the book through twice in a row, we talked about where the chickens had gone wrong. That they had jumped to conclusions without enough information. It was an opportunity for me to give my 'scientific method' and 'logic' pitch. After which we talked about how we should give others a fair chance before labeling them based on how they look.

Don't worry though if your children are younger. "Chicken Big" is a great read-aloud and they'll enjoy it for the zany characters and artwork.

For teachers who want to add it to their classrooms, or parents looking for a book for their children to practice reading, "Chicken Big" is written at the 2.7 AR level.

Pam T~
mom/blogger
Booksforkids-review

Chicken Big

Chicken Big

10/11/11| Shirley Duke
In a witty retelling of the Chicken Little story, Keith Graves’ art, narrative text, and sly dialogue evokes the original fable but presents the story in a brand new way. The book combines graphic style elements with traditional text which results in a funny, unpredictable story for children.
Chicken Big emerges from a humongous egg and is so big nobody can tell what he is. Great fun ensues as the other chickens try to decide on what kind of thing he is, and readers will identify with the humor, the good-natured patience of Chicken Big, and with his not fitting in but wanting to. When Chicken Big ends up saving the day, the silly, smallest chicken, a source of the funniest dialogue, finally figures it all out.
The satisfying ending brings the chickens and the story full circle. Kids should have a good time predicting what they chickens will come up with next, and giggles are sure to abound when this story is read.

Chicken BIG is Humongously Entertaining

Chicken BIG is Humongously Entertaining

10/11/11| Briana Goetzen
This book stood the test of a group of children ages 3, 4, and 5. They laughed, they called out "No!" at the silly questions in the story line, and they felt empathy for the big, humongous chick. This book has it all: a great plot, elements of education, silliness, and lessons in cooperation and empathy. The child in your life will love it!

Chicken Enormous (among other things!)

Chicken Enormous (among other things!)

10/11/11| Shana Fields
In it, 4 little chickens contemplate what the big chicken is. They think he might be an elephant (because he is big), a squirrel (because he likes acorns), an umbrella (because he can protect them from rain), etc but (of course), the eventually realize that he is in fact, a chicken (because "only ONE thing could be so smart, so kind, so warm, and so brave.")

My 3 year old son loves the funny chicken sounds "Buk Bok! Bok! Aaaaawk! Awk!" making it fun to read (if you like making funny sounds) and he repeats a few phrases from the book that he thinks are funny. He also loved learning the words "enormous" and "humongous." But I would have to say that our favorite parts of the book are the back cover (which we have to read at least twice every time we read the book) and the page before the title page ("What should we call this book? How about Chicken Kind of Large! OR ... Chicken Tall! No, no, no. CHICKEN SALAD!"). It really sets the tone of the book, introduces you to all the characters and makes the story even more fun. This book definitely will make you smile.

My Son's new favorite book.

My Son's new favorite book.

10/11/11| Cortney Heimerl
Keith Graves may have won the title of my new favorite children's author with this book, Chicken Big. It is a tale of crowd mentality and mistaken identity in an itty-bitty chicken coop on a teeny little farm. The story begins with an enormous egg that begins to hatch. With the many chicken opinions clucking around the flock, an unfortunately large chick becomes an outcast as they attempt to figure out what exactly he is because he is obviously too big to be a chicken! The flock is comprised of ridiculously opinionated characters and as the giant chicken continues to save them time after time, their guess of what he could be changes from an elephant to a sweater in a hilarious spiral.

The illustrations are beautifully hand-drawn with a loose, comic book design complete with exclamatory bubbles exclaimed by the chickens - RUN FOR YOUR LIVES!! Basically, this book is fun to look at, fun to read and a funny, lovely story for anyone with an affinity for a fantastically odd parable.
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