Art + Design

5 Beautiful Fonts We’ve Been Crushing On

Valentine’s Day is around the corner and love is in the air for the Design Department at Chronicle Books HQ—type love, specifically. We designers geek out over new font releases just like music nerds with album releases. There’s perhaps nothing we love more than when a typeface has perfect kerning, a comfortable x-height, or a sexy ampersand.

Here are 5 fonts our designers are currently crushing on. Which one is your favorite?

Campton

Campton

Campton type specimen

Senior Designer Neil Egan has been finding himself gravitating to Campton for various projects recently. A friendly blend of geometric and grotesque with fun punctuation and figures—what’s not to like? Campton was designed by Rene Bieder in 2014.

Buttermilk

Buttermilk

Buttermilk type specimen

Design Fellow Tiffany Chin is smitten with Buttermilk. Designed in 2009 by Jessica Hische, this bold script is whimsical and cheery, and works for a variety of display type uses. Truly the perfect fit for a valentine.

Naïve Inline

Naive Inline

Naive Inline type specimen

Naïve Inline makes Senior Designer Allison Weiner smile. “It’s a hand-drawn display face with a lot of personality. I love that it’s easy to swap out the center fill color—and even add stripes!” It was designed by Fanny Coulez and Julien Saurin for the foundry La Goupil Paris in 2013.

Sentinel

Sentinel

Sentinel type specimen
Senior Designer Ryan Hayes says, “It’s Sentinel for me. When searching for font families to design classic children’s picture books, I like to strike the right balance between familiar, timeless, and (somewhat) playful. With the contrasts in thicks and thins in the letter forms (especially at heavier weights), the playful terminals, and a useful set of inviting italics, this one lands on my short-list more often than not.” Sentinel was designed by Hoefler & Frere-Jones in 2009.

Bodoni

Bodoni

Bodoni type specimen
Bodoni is over 200 years old and still has designers swooning. First designed by Giambattista Bodoni in the 1780s, it has since spawned dozens of revivals. It’s a forever crush for Design Director Vanessa Dina, “because a classy font never goes out of style.”

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What’s your font crush—are you more Campton or more Sentinel? Oh, and if typographic topics make your heart flutter, here are a few other Design Desk posts to check out:

Emily Dubin

Emily Dubin

Senior Designer at Chronicle Books, collector of magazines, watches, and vintage ephemera. See more of her work at dubindesign.com.
Emily Dubin

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2 Comments

  • Peter Taylor February 9, 2016 at 12:30 am

    It’s always exciting to see whicjh fonts art directors like and select for particular projects. As a calligrapher as well as being children’s book author, I always live in hope, however, that more publishers actually commission texts to be written by hand, adding another layer of creativity, perhaps designing new styles to reflect each character and their voice. Is this something that you could consider? And If it’s necessary for translation, I believe its now possible to turn calligraphy into type.

    All best wishes from Australia

    Peter Taylor

    Reply

    • Emily D. February 9, 2016 at 10:13 am

      Hi Peter,
      I agree with you that there’s nothing quite like hand-drawn type to make a project unique. We do frequently commission lettering for our titles, and sometimes we create it in-house too. We’re actually putting together a blog post soon on just that topic! Stay tuned 🙂
      Thanks,
      Emily

      Reply

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